Session Descriptions

Session Descriptions

Handouts for sessions can be found underneath each description.


Thursday, April 27: An evening performance | 6:30-8:30 PM

Voices of Men
This performance is a one-man play using humor and celebrity male voice impressions to educate about men’s violence against women. Warning: Includes graphic representations of violence.
Presenter: Ben Atherton-Zeman

Handouts:


Friday, April 28: Effective programs, cultural insights, & SKill Building

Shifting cultural norms requires understanding nuances and learning practical applications. Workshops on Day II will explore how to build alliances, gain awareness of the cultural and media messages around us, and develop the skills necessary to launch various effective community programs for your organization or school. There will be practical content for a variety of professional and community audiences.


Friday, April 28 | 8:45 - 9:00 AM

Welcome & Introduction
Presenter: Jackie List, Executive Director, Safe Shelter of St. Vrain Valley


Friday, April 28 | 9:00 - 10:00 AM

Keynote: How Healthy Masculinity Can Transform Society
Presenter: Sam Bullington, PhD, University of Colorado at Boulder

Keynote Transcript: Click Here (PDF)


Friday, April 28 | 10:10 - 11:40 AM

DV 101 Plenary: Steve & Jen Skit
Presenter: Ben Atherton-Zemen

This skit, adapted and used with permission from Spruce Run Domestic Violence Project in Bangor, Maine, uses audience member participation to create scenarios where community members simulate interactions with a battered woman and her abuser. The two actors remain available and in character as the batterer and the victim to answer questions from the audience.

By the end of the session:
Participants will be able to dispel some of the more common myths relating to domestic violence, such as
why victims stay, why abusers are abusive, and what community members can do to seek solutions.

Handouts:


Friday, April 28 | 12:00 - 1:00 PM

Lunch Plenary: Rape, Racism, and Healthy Masculinity: How Are They Connected?
Presenter: Men Can Stop Rape

The power of words. The promotion of myths and stereotypes. The goal of this compelling plenary is to discuss the racist history of rape, the challenges to connecting anti-rape and anti-racism work, and the promise of creating a collective commitment to preventing racism and gender-based violence through non-violent communication.

Rape, racism and healthy masculinity intersect and are connected in many ways. The session prepares participants to make critical connections between the three in order to prevent and confront partner violence, rape and racism. Linking oppressions is a vital tool in the education necessary to inspire your campus or community to take action to prevent rape and racism on campus. Oppressions often divide us. The United States, for instance, has a history of racist and sexually violent practices that separated whites and blacks. Africans were enslaved and forced from their homelands by the millions; black women were routinely sexually assaulted by white slave owners; and black men were lynched for allegedly raping white women. Understanding and linking oppressions can help us to humanize each other and establish stronger relationships as allies.

Participants will learn:

  • How rape and racism are linked historically
  • What the racism of rape looks like in our present day
  • How competing oppressions hinder and divide us and how non-violent communication can join us
  • The constructive concept of “steering into the slide”

Friday, April 28 | Breakout Sessions #1 | 1:15 - 2:45 PM

Organizing in Your Community: Building Alliances
Presenter: Men Can Stop Rape

In isolation, attitudes, behaviors and beliefs that dehumanize or objectify people may not appear extremely harmful, but taken all together, they make up our rape culture. Stopping partner violence, therefore, does not mean waiting until you encounter an aggression in progress to intervene. Rather, it is imperative to address the root causes of partner abuse by standing up and speaking out against all the daily attitudes, assumptions and behaviors that we witness that dehumanize women and support violence.

This training will offer participants some effective strategies to help identify unhealthy masculinity as the root cause of both domestic and sexual violence and strategies to promote healthy masculinity.

Participants will:

  • Leave with knowledge of, and tools for how to reach out to other affinity groups
  • Learn daily action steps to prevent violence against women in their communities, and how to work across differences to become allies in the work of preventing gender-based violence in their community.


Not in My Locker Room! Part 1: An overview of the Coaching Boys into Men program

Presenter: Jenn Doe

This 2-part session will train advocates interested in implementing the Coaching Boys into Men (CBIM) program, an evidence-based prevention curriculum for male athletes. Attendees will learn results of a pilot in the St. Vrain Valley Schools, how to gain community buy-in and techniques for training and supporting coaches to facilitate the program. Interactive exercises will provide participants with tools to become champions of CBIM and leverage the power of sports to promote healthy relationships.

At the end of the workshop, participants will:

  • Understand how the CBIM program works to leverage the power of sports to promote healthy relationships,
  • Know how to assess community readiness and identify and engage key stakeholders for support, and
  • Walk away with all the tools necessary to implement CBIM in their communities.

Handouts:

Learn more about the CBIM program here: www.coachescorner.org

True Man Program: Transforming the Way We View and Practice Masculinity
Presenter: Derek McCoy, Project PAVE

The True Man Program in partnership with the Denver Broncos is designed to challenge boys and men to become allies in the prevention of domestic and sexual violence through a team framework. Derick McCoy of Project PAVE will provide a background of the history and evolution of the program, as well as his history and evolution regarding masculinity. Through a dialogue based activity and a few media viewings.

Participants will gain a clearer understanding of following areas of necessary male cultural transformation:

  • General expressions of masculine identity
  • Emotional intelligence and management
  • Inter-relational dynamics.

Learn more about Project PAVE here: www.projectpave.org

Bystander Intervention Training: A Model Approach for Community Engagement
Presenter: Teresa Wroe, University of Colorado at Boulder

The University of Colorado Boulder utilizes Bystander Intervention training as a foundational approach to addressing harmful, abusive and problematic behaviors on its campus. Research shows that lasting attitude and behavior change comes from interventions that allow people to maintain and enhance their existing self-concepts. The vast majority of people have a strong “helper” identity and CU’s training approach capitalizes on this to create relevancy for all students. The bystander education approach applied in this workshop is based on research indicating that when people have the chance to practice thinking through situations, they can see more opportunities to help, have a range of strategies that might work for them and for the situation, and feel more confident in intervening. Practicing these skills in training can lead to increased awareness and action in real-life situations.

Participants will:

  • Learn what elements of the bystander approach are most effective for prevention
  • Be able to implement effective bystander skills into prevention education for students

Handouts:


Friday, April 28 | Breakout Sessions #2 | 2:55 - 4:25 PM


Advertising and the Social Messages of Masculinity

Presenter: Adrian Valvidia, Men Can Stop Rape

This workshop examines advertising and the social messages of masculinity that our culture and in particular young men and women and receive on a daily, or even hourly, basis. It will examine at how masculinity is used and distorted, and how stereotypes of both women and men are perpetuated to try to sell men products. Many of these products also have harmful health ramifications.

Participants will improve their awareness and skills in analyzing common sources of messages that promote unhealthy masculinity.


Not in My Locker Room! Part 2: Coaches Training
Presenter: Jenn Doe

This second part of this 2-part session will focus on training Athletic Directors, coaches, school staff, teachers, or administrators interested in learning more and/or implementing the Coaching Boys into Men (CBIM) program. Interested community members and staff from other advocacy agencies who would like to see and example of a coaches training are also encouraged to attend.

Participants will leave with an understanding of:

  • How to facilitate their own CBIM program with an athletic team
  • How to deliver a CBIM training to coaches

Handouts:

Learn more about the CBIM program here: www.coachescorner.org


Bystander Intervention Training: A Model Approach for Community Engagement

Presenter: Teresa Wroe, University of Colorado at Boulder

The University of Colorado Boulder utilizes Bystander Intervention training as a foundational approach to addressing harmful, abusive and problematic behaviors on its campus. Research shows that lasting attitude and behavior change comes from interventions that allow people to maintain and enhance their existing self-concepts. The vast majority of people have a strong “helper” identity and CU’s training approach capitalizes on this to create relevancy for all students. The bystander education approach applied in this workshop is based on research indicating that when people have the chance to practice thinking through situations, they can see more opportunities to help, have a range of strategies that might work for them and for the situation, and feel more confident in intervening. Practicing these skills in training can lead to increased awareness and action in real-life situations.

Participants will:

  • Learn what elements of the bystander approach are most effective for prevention
  • Be able to implement effective bystander skills into prevention education for students

Handouts:


Cultural Socialization of Manhood and Its Impact on Men’s Emotional Health

Presenter: Tim Wienecke, MA, LPCC, NCC

Modern cultural masculine norms emphasize that men and boys should be powerful, fearless, in control, emotionless and strong. These notions can be repressive and toxic. The impact of toxic masculinity on men’s partners and children cannot be denied: Men and boys who adhere to rigid, traditional notions of gender roles and masculinity are more likely to report having used violence against a partner. Clinicians are in a unique position to create positive change in our community by engaging men with whom they work about the internalized pain that these limitations have created and work on strategies that can release them toward a more healthy, respectful manhood. In this training, we will explore how this toxicity integrates into the male identity, the clinical impact it has, and explore ways to empower our work with the men we serve.

Participants will:

  • Gain awareness of the clinical impact of “toxic masculinity” on men in our culture
  • Develop basic intervention strategies to better engage the men in our care

Friday, April 28 | 4:35 - 5:00 PM

Closing Call to Action
Presenter: Ben Atherton-Zeman